The Importance of Using Candidate Experience Surveys

“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.” – Warren Buffett

From the moment candidates apply for one of your vacant roles to when you reject them or extend a job offer,  job seekers have a lot of interactions with your company. This entails a very important part of candidate experience. But first, let’s address the basics- what is candidate experience? And why is it important? 

Candidate experience is the series of interactions that a job seeker has with your company throughout the recruiting process. This includes attracting, sourcing, recruiting, interviewing, hiring, and onboarding. A good candidate experience will make candidates feel like their time has been respected and that there’s transparency and clarity, regardless of the outcome. This basically means that even if the candidate isn’t hired for the job, a positive candidate experience can go a long way.

To improve your candidate experience, you need to know the efficiency of your hiring process. Recruiters are advised to do this by putting themselves in candidates’ shoes by surveying them. Surveys reveal the strengths and weaknesses in each stage of your recruitment cycle, thus, allowing you to refine and improve your recruiting strategy. They can also help you understand what candidates are looking for from their next role. Are there any benefits that you’re not offering? Are there any aspects of your work culture and ethics that aren’t coming through clearly? You’ll never know until you start asking them.

Why is candidate experience worth measuring? 

Companies have been trying to learn candidates’ needs and expectations, and identify the factors that influence their experience the most. This is important for a number of reasons:

  • Candidate experience leads to sales losses. Virgin Records found that they were losing $5million each year due to the impact of their flawed hiring process.
  • An eRecruiter survey showed that two-thirds of employers claim to care about candidate experience at every stage of the recruitment process.
  • At the same time, 57% of candidates say that companies don’t care about people who are applying for a job.
  • The experience a candidate has with a company’s hiring process ultimately impacts a candidate’s decision to accept or decline a job offer.
  • The Talent Board reports that 73% of the candidate was never asked for feedback on their experiences in the application process
  • Candidates increasingly share their experiences with others. Poor candidate experience leads to distrust of your brand

For eg: 72% of job seekers share a poor interview experience on social media. Websites like Glassdoor make the recruitment process very transparent and negative experiences will be publicly shared.

  • Nearly 60% of candidates have had a poor experience, and 72% of them shared the experience either online or with someone directly, according to Career Arc

Certain studies also show that women and underrepresented minorities face challenges related to searching for jobs and interviewing for them that others do not. Learning about their perspective on their candidate experience can help you spot issues in your company’s interview process and identify strategies to address them.
How does a business find out about all of those things? With a candidate experience survey, of course!

What does a candidate experience survey do?

  • It captures the best qualities of your candidates.
  • Helps you become more self-aware of your business and its operation.
  • Gathers anonymous feedback about your hiring process.
  • Identifies the areas that need the most improvement.
  • Boosts your brand by giving something back.

When do you carry out the survey?
Make sure your candidates are informed about the surveys. Deliver a clear statement right at the top of the process to make them aware that you’ll be asking for their help. Informing candidates that you want to gather information about your process anonymously can ensure good chances of receiving unbiased information.

Pre-interview survey

Sending out a survey to candidates, before the interview process, gives you an insight into how your applicants perceive your brand.

This can help you measure the effectiveness of your marketing and advertising, finding out how accurate your job descriptions are, and what information was missing according to your candidates.

Post-interview survey

This helps you to understand the candidate’s experience of the interview process, their first impressions of the business, the areas that candidates considered well managed, and those missing or poorly delivered. The questions that can address areas like the clarity of instructions, how comfortable the candidates were, did they feel confused, belittled, respected, etc.

Final-stage survey

This survey helps to gain an understanding of communication issues and strengths, delivery of detailed information, consistency of information and dwells further into the elements that you missed that the candidates expected to see.

One of the most popular and easiest ways to survey candidate experience is utilizing the Net Promotor Score (NPS) method. This method has been used for years to measure the level of client experience in the field of candidate experience. It can include questions like: How willing would you be to recommend applying to company Y to other candidates on a scale of  0 to 10 (where 0 is “I strongly don’t recommend” and 10 is „I strongly recommend”)?

The final stage can also include a 5-star rating system. impress.ai is one such AI-based recruitment automation company that includes the rating system as part of its recruitment process. The candidate also has an option to give additional feedback. Impress.ai platform also  provides open ended survey questions to capture the candidate experience.

Conclusion:

And finally, none of your results and data is worth anything if you don’t use them to facilitate change in the necessary areas. Identifying your strengths gives you a platform to deliver more, and finding out where you fall short creates opportunities to fix the flaws and fill the gaps in your system.  To do this, recruiters can leverage any AI-based recruitment automation platforms such as impress.ai to capture & make sense of the candidate experience surveys. These platforms will help you identify their strengths, understand areas of improvement, and fix it. This will help to maintain a consistent & positive  candidate experience throughout the recruitment process.

legal risk & artificial intelligence

Legal risks in AI in recruitment and How to avoid them

“We must address, individually and collectively, moral and ethical issues raised by cutting-edge research in artificial intelligence and biotechnology, which will enable significant life extension, designer babies, and memory extraction.”

—Klaus Schwab

Merging recruitment with technological innovation always comes with potential legal risks, and this can occur parallel to the time during which employers are looking for faster, more accurate, and cost-effective recruitment platforms that leverage the latest technological innovations to streamlines the hiring process through artificial intelligence (AI) tools.  

Employers are turning to AI to transform recruitment and generate a seamless hiring process. This includes automating the candidate sourcing, candidate pool screening, and using AI assessment tools, such as conversational chatbots and video interviewing tools that can measure a candidate’s strengths based on factors such as facial expression, word choice, body language, and vocal tone. However, the use of artificial intelligence (AI) and other automated decision-making (ADM) technology doesn’t come without risk. Employers should tread carefully while implementing such HR Tech solutions.

In this article, we examine the legal considerations and safeguards that are currently being undertaken by the United States of America, Europe, and Singapore.

Legal considerations are generally rooted in two areas of law:

Both these laws are heavily disaggregated civil law considerations.

  1. Employment law
    1. The Employment law precedents are also the source of significant tort-based liability (in the US) owing to the low threshold set for discriminatory action.
    2. A big area of concern in employment law is bias and discriminatory effects (as opposed to discriminatory intent as is usually the concern in the human decision.
  2. Privacy Law
    1. Privacy law is increasingly being aggregated under the GDPR framework set out, and the developing landscape of the field makes compliance even more nuanced and imperative. However, in the US there is once again a very low tort liability threshold that opens up the risk of liability much more broadly. 

The two key areas of the Privacy Law to keep in mind: 

  1. AI and The Privacy Paradigm: In a field where personal data is necessary to product functionality, the following concerns occur: Is the privacy threshold raised? If non-discrimination as a result of opt-out isn’t viable, is that still a breach of privacy?
  2. Facial and voice analysis and privacy: Facial analysis in AI recruitment has already come under fire for bias, however, the feature has also been routinely criticised as an invasion of privacy as it performs in-depth analysis that arguably is not possible in a human interface interview. Additionally, the storing, processing, and analysis of biometric data presents another privacy consideration entirely. 
  1.  The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

The EEOC has made clear that employers using AI in their hiring process can be liable for unintended discrimination, and AI vendors regularly include non-liability clauses in their contracts with employers. Therefore, employers need to validate AI tools and take steps to ensure that they do not cause inadvertent discrimination when hiring. Employers should test the capabilities of the AI ​​algorithm in the pilot system to see if the results are biased. For large employers, you can use your company’s, Chief AI Officer. Small employers may prefer to contract with a data scientist. In any case, these individuals need to work with their employer’s attorney to validate the data, check for prejudices, and determine the risk of liability while protecting information in agreement with legal liability.

Although AI has not yet been federally regulated for adoption, Illinois has just passed the first law of its kind, called the Artificial Intelligence Video Interview Act. Beginning January 1, 2020, the law requires employers to analyze candidate video interviews using AI to: 

  • Employers must notify applicants that AI will be used in their video interviews.
  • Employers must explain to applicants how the AI works and what characteristics the AI will be tracking in relation to their fitness for the position. 
  • Employers must obtain the applicant’s consent to use AI to evaluate the candidate.
  • Employers may only share the video interview with those who have AI expertise needed to evaluate the candidate and must otherwise keep the video confidential.
  • Employers must comply with an applicant’s request to destroy his or her interview video within 30 days.
  1. EU and AI use in recruiting and hiring:

EU officials stated that AI technology needs proactive regulation now, as it may become difficult to regulate AI later due to the rapid advances in the technology, and insisted on finding a balance between reasonable, commercial, and operational interests of companies, and privacy and anti-discrimination rights of employees.

  • AI systems providers would need to supply detailed documentation about how their systems work to ensure that they follow the proposed rules and that failure to comply would mean facing penalties and fines of up to 30 million euros (approximately US$36 million) or even higher for large global organizations.
  • If the EU proposal passes, it will create a more standardized, ethical, and transparent approach to using AI in the recruitment and hiring process, noted Eric Sydell, executive vice president of innovation at software company Modern Hire.

The Commission proposes to ban completely AI systems that:

  • manipulate persons through subliminal techniques or exploit the fragility of vulnerable individuals, and could potentially harm the manipulated individual or third person;
  • serve for general purposes of social scoring, if carried out by public authorities; or
  • are used for running real-time remote biometric identification systems in publicly accessible spaces for law enforcement purposes.
  1. Singapore’s AI Governance Framework

Singapore introduced its Model Artificial Intelligence Governance Framework in January 2019 at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos. The two guiding principles of the framework state that decisions made by AI should be “explainable, transparent and fair”; and AI systems should be human-centric. These principles are then developed into four areas of guidance. 

  • The first is establishing or adapting internal governance structures and measures to “incorporate values, risks, and responsibilities relating to algorithmic decision-making”. 
  • The second determines the level of human involvement in AI decision-making and helps organisations decide what their risk appetite is.
  • The third area of guidance focuses on operations management and deals with factors that should be considered when “developing, selecting and maintaining AI models, including data management”.
  •  The final area shares strategies for communicating with stakeholders and management on the use of AI solutions.

The framework translates ethical principles into pragmatic measures that businesses can do.

Why you can trust impress.ai

The European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a set of industry regulation that became effective on May 25th 2018. The purpose of the legislation was to give EU citizens greater control over the data that they provide online. GDPR covers companies that are operating within the EU and for companies that offer services within the European Union electronically, that track / store personal data in aggregate. With impress.ai operating primarily in non-EU jurisdictions, it provides both GDPR compliant and non-GDPR compliant versions of impress.ai’s’ recruitment automation Software-as-a-Service. Hiring companies, that are clients of impress.ai can require impress ai’s SaaS to be GDPR compliant as part of the service agreement.

Why recruiters and HR need conversational AI chatbots

We’ve all had negative experiences with chatbots, where answers seem narrow and unhelpful, particularly in customer service interactions. Let’s face it, they can be infuriating, and this turns many people off when thinking about using the technology in their own organisations.

However, technology is rapidly advancing, and this mindset might have you missing out on a new generation of chatbots that can enhance every step of your recruitment process. Conversational AI powers today’s chatbots, and it could be a game-changer for your business.

Bots, chatbots, conversational AI – what does it all mean? 

It can feel like these terms are interchangeable, but there are some notable differences. A bot is a piece of code that can perform actions without language-based interaction, such as moving data between two spreadsheets. A chatbot answers inquiries, and conversational AI is the technology that allows it to determine intent. 

Intelligent chatbots can play three critical roles in your recruitment process, all of which can save you significant time and money while delivering a better first impression.

Collecting information with ease

The first role is information collection. Recruitment is all about data, and you want to capture the right amount of information to make the best hiring decision.

From basic screening questions to scoring assessment submissions, collecting and reviewing this information can be incredibly time-consuming. Traditionally, online applications collect all this information via long and detailed forms, which can be overwhelming and even off-putting for candidates.      The data then needs to be reviewed by a team member, a process that quickly becomes exhausting and is open to human bias.

impress.ai chatbots eliminate the need for these forms, replacing them with a bite-sized step-by-step guided process that’s seamless for candidates. The data is then transitioned smoothly into your system, giving you a single source of truth.  

Delivering a winning experience 24/7

With this technology, your recruitment process is always on. Applicants can start and progress their application anytime, anywhere. This approach is perfect for candidates who need to apply after hours or even international recruitment programs.

Detailed and intelligent FAQ modules mean your system can answer FAQs, learning as it goes along. And they are effective. impress.ai conversational AI has up to a 98.4% success rate in answering candidate inquiries instantly, without human interaction. And the small number of questions that are too nuanced and complex are escalated to a dashboard where they can be answered by a team member at the next available opportunity.

Guiding your candidate from pre-screening to first interview

With impress.ai, chatbots can guide candidates through the process, keeping them informed and engaged at every step to reduce candidate dropout. Intelligent chatbots can guide your applicants through each step seamlessly, making decisions based on real-time information.

For example, in the pre-screening phase, if the candidate doesn’t meet the criteria for this specific role but may be suited to other roles at your organisation, the system can guide them away from the application process to your careers platform to review other opportunities.

Those candidates who meet your screening criteria are guided through to interview questions or skill-based assessments, such as Aon Assessments. The chatbot can even decide which assessment is best for each candidate based on their stated skill set.      It can then score assessments and rank candidates, putting all the information at your fingertips.

By completing these steps and guiding your candidates through the process, the chatbot has ultimately performed the first interview for you, delivering a high potential shortlist ready for progression. 

Time to revisit your options?

If it’s been a while since you last looked at chatbot technology for your organisation – it may be a great time to revisit. Organisations worldwide are gearing up for the Great Resignation, where some great talent will be out there on the jobs market, and speed and efficiency will be vital to making the most of the opportunity.

impress.ai clients have seen significant time and cost savings, with one client saving 311 hours of productivity and another, an impressive $66K (SGD) on just one graduate program. Our AI-powered solution increases speed, accuracy and quality of hires, all while delivering a winning candidate experience. If you are looking for a competitive edge in the recruitment market, get in touch to find out how we can help.

What Roles Do Chatbots Work for in AI Recruitment?

“The world is about to be re-written, and bots are going to be a big part of the future.” – Phil Libin, venture capitalist and co-founder of Evernote

Introduction:

Before we get to its many functions, let’s understand the basics of a chatbot. For starters, what is it? An AI chatbot is a conversational interface that helps carry out basic processes using artificial intelligence and machine learning. This could be something as simple as letting a recruiter know how many interviews they have on a given day to something more complex, like setting up interviews with candidates. 

There are many benefits to using a chatbot, but one big one is the fact that it can be present in more places than an actual human recruiter. For example, the same chatbot can be talking to one person on email, another via SMS, one on a social media channel like LinkedIn, and another still doing actual work with the recruiter within their ATS. If one person had to have all those conversations at the same time, it could get confusing and overwhelming quickly. A chatbot can field all of those questions and help each individual concurrently. 

When you’re answering the big question regarding the many roles of a chatbot in recruitment, the short answer is that it can play an important role in converting inbound candidate prospects for all kinds of jobs. So, as long as you are prepared to post the role online on your job page or a job board, you can use a chatbot for the role. 

The Objective:

The main goal of having a chatbot is to help move a qualified prospective candidate to your candidate conversion pipeline. It’s a great way to move the candidate along the funnel because it’s interactive. This means that your drop-off rate, when compared to traditional methods of webpage job applications, can be 40-50% lower when you use chatbots.

Some of the things a chatbot can do to help move the candidate down the conversion funnel are company branding, engaging job seekers, scheduling interviews, automated pre-screening, document collection, sourcing candidates, improving diversity, and answering queries. There is no doubt that a well-trained recruiter is better than any chatbot. But it is just not practical to have all inbound candidates talk to a recruiter.

Three of the most widely discussed ways to use your chatbot in recruitment are answering frequently asked questions, pre-screening candidates, and scheduling interviews. But chatbots play other important roles that are less obvious. Here are 6 of those operations:

1. Answering FAQs

Just 38% of consumers want to talk with a human when engaging a brand, and 69% of them prefer to use chatbots because they can deliver quick answers to simple questions and obtain basic information quickly. What are the candidates’ most frequently asked questions? Generally speaking, the most common questions asked are about applying for a job, specifics about a position, salary, and their application status. But since the pandemic began, new questions on Covid preparedness, remote and work from home policies, and medical and personal leave paid benefits have been more popular. 

2. Automating pre-screening

An AI chatbot can rapidly pre-screen candidates based on job applications, resumes, and other written materials, as well as on pre-recorded video interviews submitted by job seekers. This leaves the recruiting team free to focus on functions that require a human touch. This includes following up with the most qualified applicants via live interviews conducted either virtually or in person. Pre-screening is just one of the routine recruitment processes that chatbots can handle for you. Automation of processes like background checks, skills assessments, and routing requisitions for approval is also something the AI-digital assistant enables seamlessly.

3. Scheduling interviews

You can add interview scheduling to that process automation list, as well. Companies need to make the most of their HR staff, giving recruiters more time to work on sourcing and building relationships with in-demand talent.

4. Representing your brand

Introducing a chatbot means adding a new touchpoint for your customers to reach out to your business in the customer journey. Every touchpoint represents an opportunity to strengthen your brand equity by evoking your brand’s tone of voice. A total of 39% of women rank company brand as a “very important” factor when deciding to apply for a job, while 33% of men say the same, according to Glassdoor. Additionally, a chatbot can help you boost your company’s bottom line. Data from LinkedIn demonstrates that strong employer branding results in an average 43% drop in recruitment costs.

5. Engaging with job seekers from the beginning to beyond

Potential candidates can get turned off when companies don’t get back to them immediately. In one study from 2020, 52% of job hunters named “a lack of response from employers” as their biggest frustration. Chatbots can do much more than initiate engagement by welcoming newcomers to your career site, asking how they can help, and answering FAQs. When you capture job seekers’ contact info and other data, you can keep your candidates engaged by:

  • Thanking them for applying
  • Reminding them of interviews
  • Keeping them updated on their application status
  • Informing them of future job openings when those arise

        6. Sourcing candidates

Chatbots can help source job candidates in a variety of ways:                                            

  • Connect with passive job seekers: Recruiting chatbots can be a subtle way to approach candidates who are not actively looking for new jobs. These job seekers may be more willing to engage with a chatbot than a recruiter because it’s a lesser commitment. This also saves your team from wasting time on job seekers who are less likely to apply.
  • Help candidates apply by text: There are perfectly good reasons to have a longer application, but if you’re losing candidates, it may be time to prioritize the type of data needed. For many, the solution is allowing candidates to apply by text. A chatbot guides candidates through a quick and straightforward application, and just like that, they’re under consideration.
  • Facilitate online job fairs: In the pandemic/post-pandemic era, job fairs have gotten tough to pull off. Chatbots can help communicate and facilitate online virtual job fairs, though recruiters can choose to manage conversations themselves if they wish.

7. Opening the doors to diverse candidates

Companies today strive for diversity across regional and national borders, race, gender, and age. In 2020, 77% of talent professionals agreed that diversity will be a crucial factor in the future of recruiting, also according to LinkedIn. Researchers also predicted that the increased remote work options due to the pandemic will help to raise geographic diversity. Chatbots can also be used to help prevent unconscious bias during candidate pre-screening.

8. Assessments

A chatbot’s ability to deliver basic assessments within a conversational experience makes it quite an asset for the recruiting team. This is mostly because it automatically advances the candidates to the next stage or schedules interviews if the candidate passes the assessment stage. Chats can also trigger specialised suitable tests that can be integrated into the system.

In Conclusion:

  • Of the 8 things mentioned that a chatbot can potentially do for your candidates, all of these can be effectively delivered for junior to mid-level roles. 
  • For senior roles or hard-to-fill roles, you are better off taking out screening and assessment from that list and giving more personal attention to these candidates by having recruiters talk to them.
  • For manual work, on the other hand, you can likely remove the assessment from the list because it is better to assess manual work live with someone observing the candidate do the work. However, you can still automatically collect certification documents or background information from these candidates.

Here’s our CEO, Sudhanshu Ahuja, giving you helpful insights on the roles of a chatbot: https://youtu.be/uBWEiwKkR9A

Curious about whether to add a chatbot to your recruiting process? Talk to our team for a free consultation today by clicking here.

candidate engagement

Candidate Engagement –Why is it important?

With a tight labour market, the balance of power has shifted from organisations to talented candidates. Recruiters will agree that it is not tough to discover the right talent. The real challenge is in drawing the interest and time from these applicants. In the current scenario, candidate engagement is that magic word which can turn things around.

What is candidate engagement?

If there is one thing that all recruiters will agree upon, it is that recruitment depends a lot on relationships. As the connection between a candidate and the recruiter strengthens, it becomes easier to hire and onboard.

Candidate engagement is the process through which recruiters can initiate and nurture these relationships. It is what prevents promising candidates from dropping out of the hiring process.

Candidate engagement is not about sending a one-off text message to the applicant. It is about being consistent in your interaction with the candidates. 

Is candidate engagement the same as candidate experience?

Although it may seem similar, engagement is a small part of the experience. Candidate engagement is how you interact with the applicants. On the other hand, the experience is how they feel about the hiring process as a whole.

Why does candidate engagement matter?

Gallup found in a survey that 51% of the talent pool is looking for a new job. In this scenario, the opportunity to hire new employees is enormous. However, the window is short as most talented candidates stay in the market for 10 days.

The traditional way of sourcing is not always the best way to tap this talent pool. If the recruiters have to source from square one, it slows them down. 

Besides, engagement drives a good candidate experience. 22% of the candidates say they will inform their circle if the hiring process wasn’t satisfactory. It is the last thing that organisations want – undesirable publicity.

A more successful method is when recruiters identify the right talent and initiate an engagement process. As they build a one-on-one connection with these candidates, they develop a talent pipeline. It becomes easier to hire them when the time comes.

Apart from this, it sets apart the organisation as an employer that invests deeply in finding the right talent. It helps the organisation in creating a proactive recruitment model instead of a reactive one. As it does so, it can hire on time and win competitive advantage.

What is the best strategy for successful candidate engagement?

A successful candidate strategy is the one that fosters continuous interaction with the candidates. It doesn’t imply calling the candidates daily. Instead, it means using a variety of ways to engage with the talent at all the right times.

Recruiters are an essential part of this strategy. They can contribute by becoming the gate-keepers of the plan and streamlining it. They can also add value by dividing the candidates into different buckets. It helps in creating more targeted and value-adding touch-points.

Technology is the next resource that organisations can leverage. It allows them to create workflows and automate emails and texts. Moreover, AI-powered tools can help organisations in understanding candidate behaviours. It can also help in pulling new and passive candidates.

Finally, organisations need to design a process with the end goal in mind. For instance, the purpose could be to engage the qualified candidates who have applied in the past. Organisations can send them newsletters or thought leadership blogs to stay in touch. Recruiters can automate and send emails for new job openings. Such emails will allow them the chance to apply again. It can significantly reduce the sourcing effort and accelerate hiring.

What are the best practices for candidate engagement?

Invest in your careers website

For most candidates, your careers page is the first touch-point. In fact, 53% of them will first visit the page before they apply. It is where they go to seek information and know more about the company. There are multiple ways to leverage it to excite the applicants for a possible career with you.

If you haven’t worked on it for a long time, it may time to revamp it. Use videos to show the company culture and the working environment. If possible, throw light on some exciting projects that are happening currently.

You can also have a feature on your current employees. The first step would be to interview your employees and ask the best part about working with your organisation. You can also shoot a day in office in their lives. As you do it, you give a preview to the candidates about how life will look like, in your company.

Use social media

In today’s digital world, if you are not on social media, you could be losing a huge opportunity. These channels can become a great platform to build your brand and engage talented candidates.

The talent pool in the market consists of both active as well as passive candidates. You can publish the current job openings to attract the applicants looking for a job. However, you will need to do more to engage with passive candidates. 

Your content strategy should be around showcasing your organisation as an ideal place to work. You can share thought leadership blogs or insightful videos to engage with this section of candidates.

Use AI

AI is that reliable friend that can engage potential employees in your absence. Not only can it provide all the right information, but it can also evaluate them for the current openings.

Firstly, an AI-powered chatbot on the careers page can engage the visitors. After understanding if the visitor is a potential candidate, it can show the current job openings as per their interest.

Secondly, the chatbot can mimic human conversations and answer their queries. It can handle a variety of questions related to culture, perks and benefits, job description etc. 

If the candidates are interested in applying to a job, AI-powered chatbot can help them in completing their application. It can also tell them if they have missed any piece of information.

The chatbot offered by Impress does all this and more. It can conduct the first round of the interview and give them scores. The recruiters can look at the results and take it ahead from there.

Share status updates

Candidates find it disappointing when they apply for a job position and don’t hear from the organisation. They would like to know if the organisation received their application and considered it for the job position.

Companies can tackle this easily by automating status updates. By sending an automated email and text after the candidate applies, organisations can solve a significant part of the problem. 

As the process advances, organisations can send similar updates to keep the engagement high. If the candidate is unable to make it to the next round, it will do more good to send communication about it. You don’t have to mention the reason or detailed feedback. It will suffice to say that the organisation won’t be able to move ahead with the application. However, they are welcome to apply again in the future.

The most critical point here to personalise these emails. You can use AI for this purpose. The tool offered by Impress allows the recruiters to send such status emails.

Communicate a clear hiring timeline

Changing a job and picking an organisation is a crucial decision for the candidates. When they are in the market, they are good chances that they are interviewing at other places. 

They will appreciate it if you can share a hiring timeline with them. Tell the candidates if they should expect any personality or aptitude tests. Also, inform them about the number of interview rounds that are likely to happen. It is easy to send out this email when they reach a significant stage in your recruitment process.

As they will remain informed, they won’t feel lost during the interview process. 

Automated interview scheduling

When the recruiters have to call and schedule the interviews, the process becomes ineffective. Firstly, it becomes an operational task with many chances of error. Secondly, rescheduling takes a lot of effort.

The tool offered by Impress allows the candidates to schedule their interviews as per their convenience. They can see the available interview slots and select a suitable time. The tool integrates with the calendar of the recruiters and hiring managers for a streamlined process.

When the control is with the candidates, they will be better engaged.

One to one conversation

When the candidates reach an advanced level in the interview process, it is time for more personal conversations. It is when recruiters need to step in and engage the candidates with one to one emails, texts and phone calls.

In some organisations, it may require making a tactical or mindset change. However, personalised communication can make a whole lot of difference. As the interaction becomes frequent, the candidates will know that the organisation is keen on hiring them. 

Moreover, it gives recruiters a chance to understand if they are interviewing elsewhere. It will allow them to move quickly and make an offer at the right time.

Final Words

In today’s time of talent war, organisations need to put themselves out there. Candidate engagement is the key to ensuring that candidates choose you above the others.